Comfort Food – Meatloaf

Comfort Food – Meatloaf


On this episode of the Galley podcast, we’re returning to our Comfort Food series where we’re making two really nice recipes from the Duluth Grill.  First, the primary recipe is for their Gluten-Free Meatloaf.  This meatloaf features Minnesota wild rice and buckwheat flour.  We’ll also be topping it with the Duluth Grill’s homemade ketchup.  In our Culinary Sojourns series, it’s week two in our Italian travels through Marcella Hazan’s Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking.

When I think Comfort Food, I think “working man” food.  That’s what this series is all about.  Tailored to the guy who’s been loading ships on the docks or getting up early for that first shift welding shears up in Two Harbors.  This is the kind of food he’d want to come home to and then relax in the easy chair with a cup of coffee with a piece of homemade blueberry pie.  I think of this as our blue collar series.  But it’s also family food, the kind everyone can sit back and enjoy.

Ketchup

For homemade ketchup, this recipe is found in the Duluth Grill Cookbook volume I on page 78.  I think the advantages of making this recipe is that you can adjust the flavors to suit your tastes as you prepare it by adjusting various components.  The ketchup when prepared according to the recipe works very well when topped onto the meatloaf.

Meatloaf

This recipe is also found in the Duluth Grill Cookbook, volume I on page 100.  Personally, I don’t think you can really top this meatloaf recipe whether you make homemade ketchup or go with store bought.  We found the first recipe really complemented the flavors in this meatloaf with its tangy sweet flavor.  But, I’ll note the meatloaf is doubly terrific when dipped in regular Heinz ketchup so still keep that on standby.

This meat loaf features Minnesota wild rice and buckwheat flour.  We took a couple liberties with this recipe as whenever we see the recipe calling for canned ingredients.  Instead of using canned chilies, we substituted an Anaheim and red pepper blend for this and really like the flavors of these components when added to meatloaf.  We also used fresh tomatoes and diced them and combined all of our fresh ingredients and spread them out on a sheet tray and then roasted them in the over until they started taking on color.  This aided in concentrating the flavors of the onions, peppers and tomatoes as well as reducing some of the liquid that goes into our meatloaf recipe.

When I think Comfort Food, I think “working man” food… Tailored to the guy who’s been loading ships on the docks or getting up early for that first shift welding shears up in Two Harbors… I think of this as our blue collar series.  But it’s also family food, the kind everyone can sit back and enjoy.

The second time we made this recipe, we decided to portion out our ingredients into six loaves.  The reason we did that is to be able to easily portion out our finished meatloaves and freeze a portion of recipe to eat later.  Cooking them individually like this, the juice from the beef runs off so you end up with a drier meatloaf so I sort of prefer cooking them in a large pan to keep all those delicious flavors incorporated into the meatloaf.  The drawback is storage and freezing if you are portioning those individually for dinner or lunches as you would probably need a freezer zip-lock for each portion you freeze as they are tough to separate if you freeze them together.

Additional Podcast Addendum

Also, don’t forget to vote in our Podcast Poll in which you can give us anonymous feedback on various subjects related to the Galley podcast. Be sure to check that out and let us know your opinion. I’ll see how the response is and I’ll probably change the question every week or two. We do appreciate your feedback. It’s just a couple of clicks and you’re done.

We thank Sterling Berry who runs the website “Great Lakes Vessel History” for allowing us to quote factual content from his website.  You can find him on the web at www.greatlakesvesselhistory.com to learn more.   

Other source mentioned in Sailing through the 60s and 70s include selected bibliographic details about John Hulst’s life, The Michigan Alumnus, Volume 59, University of Michigan. Alumni Association, UM Libraries, 1952.

The Duluth Grill Cookbook can either be purchased at the restaurant or on their website.

As always, let us know your questions or comments by e-mailing us at podcast@cdlgalley.com.




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